Country

Drinking water for thirteen villages

Objectives:
TIM-SFV aimed to facilitate access to safe drinking water for 80,000 villagers in 13 remote villagers in the region of Aloatra Mangoro in Madagascar. The objective was to decrease the prevalence of water-related diseases in the region by at least 30%, thanks to the permanent availability of drinking water, through chlorination, in at least 80% of project intervention zones and the permanent availability of clean water in all health centres (to decrease the number of water-related diseases contracted in hospital, by at least 50%).

 

Results:
Watalys kits were successfully delivered to the thirteen target villages together with training and awareness campaigns for the villagers, carried out by volunteer “water committees”. The rate of diarrheal disease compared to that of the total population of the Alaotra Mangoro region fell from an average of 8% in 2004, to an average of between 1.3 and 2.8% in 2014 (the average rate at the national level is 6%). The villagers surveyed recognised the positive impact of the home-based water purification kits. Each target village also put in place a sustainability plan in the form of a fund to pay for the maintenance or renewal of the water chlorination apparatus (part of the Watalys kit).

 

The NGO:
TIM-SFV is a Swiss association founded in 2002 in Geneva. It aims to promote access to safe drinking water in rural areas through the provision of an apparatus for water chlorination: Watalys. The apparatus operates with a car battery or a solar panel and renders drinkable up to 4,000 litres of water per hour. The program includes training local populations to make them self-sufficient in their water management.


Back
80'000
people


Duration
March 2011 - December 2014

Location
Aloatra Mangoro region

With whom
J'aime Madagascar (formerly TIM-SFV)

Website
http://www.jaimemadagascar.ch/

News

06 March 2015
Four projects completed in Chad, Cote d’Ivoire, Madagascar and Mali

Four organisations presented at the end of 2014 the final reports of their projects funded by the Addax and Oryx Foundation.

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